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Half Plant Half Animal

Half Plant Half Animal
The eastern emerald elysia (Elysia Chlorotica) is a slug that steals the ability to synthesize light from the algae it eats. Unbelievably, this is a photosynthetic animal.


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Rating: 2.9 / 5 (809 votes)
Posted by kazchen on October 26, 2010
Hits: 6387

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Comments

Posted by Tibor on May 21, 2011 at 12:25 pm
Not only does E. chlorotica turn sunlight into energy - something only plants can do - it also appears to have swiped this ability from the algae it consumes. Native to the salt marshes of New England and Canada, these sea slugs use contraband chlorophyll-producing genes and cell parts called chloroplasts from algae to carry out photosynthesis.
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